A packed room for Yin Yoga

In Janary I attended a Yin Yoga and Mindfulness Teacher Training course at Triyoga with Sarah Lo. I’d become interested in Yin Yoga since training as an acupuncturist, as it is based on Traditional Chinese Medicine. I thought it would also be interesting to train at Triyoga and experience the vibe of a large London studio.

Contents

The course had a wonderful simplicity to it, perhaps unsurprisingly as it was aimed at all levels. Maybe less is more at a yoga class, particulalry a Yin one and multiple postures and complex cues are not really needed. Lo said she would only four or five postures in one class, much to the chagrin of the studio managers. And perhaps cues cannot be given to a whole class of people as Grilley says “there are no universal prinicples of alignment because there are not universal skeletons”. So unlike some other forms of yoga (in my experience, astanga can be like this), there is no perfect position to be aiming for.

The activities included in the course were:

  • Anatomy: based on Paul Grilley’s work where he shows through pictures of bones that people have different capacities to get into postures.
  • Asana: From Sarah Power’s Insight Yoga. According to Sarah Lo, Power’s is not an anatomist and is more interested in the internal work of yoga. We’d do a short sequence based on the TCM organ pairs (e.g. Liver & Gallbladder) and looked at the best ways of resting in the position (using lots of props).
  • Mindful walking. Walking through the park inhaling “I am here”, exhaling “let it be” (from what I remember.)
  • Dialoguing: Listening to the other people without talking.
  • Journalling: Wrting down feelings after meditation.
  • Visioning: imagining what we want in our future.

Teacher

Sarah Lo has a gentle, relaxed presence, and was quietly confident without appearing egotistical. From the feedback at the end of the class, many students were impressed by this. She was a good role model for me because as an introvert, I find it easier to be this type of teacher rather than someone overly extrovert and charismatic. I liked how she said people who had took the full course could cover her classes. I feel too few  teachers support their students in this way.